Navigating the Nuances Between Design BIM and Construction BIM in Infrastructure Projects

Shoutout and credit to @ArtemBoiko for the image above, with our creative addition.

Navigating the Nuances Between Design BIM and Construction BIM in Infrastructure Projects

Building Information Modeling (BIM) stands as a foundational technology driving efficiency and precision. However, not all BIM is created equal. There are significant distinctions between Design BIM and Construction BIM that professionals in the field must understand to optimize their projects.

 

Design BIM

Design BIM primarily focuses on planning and architecture, creating detailed digital representations of buildings and infrastructure. Design Engineers use it to incorporate spatial relationships, geographic information, building component properties, and running excessive analysis, such as FEM. This model is useful for visualizing the final product, ensuring requirements and alignment, and seamless integration into the environment. However, transitioning this model to Construction BIM presents challenges. 

Some owners still procure design work deliverable as a PDF drawing even though design process may be model-based, but it is increasingly common to have IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) models from the design process also to the site.

Credits: Sobstad AS, Tanem-Tulluan

 

Construction BIM

Construction BIM is practical and hands-on, adapting design models for construction needs by adding details like temporary roads. It must be compatible with on-site machinery. A key point of Open BIM and connected workflows is that a single exported model can be accessed by designers, owners and site people, but also sent directly to the construction equipment. Workflows typically include visualization, content and continuity analysis, volume calculation, precision machine control and stake-outs. Extra work and risky conversions should be avoided and performance and usability on site equipment should be ensured.  

The LandXML format is synonymous with Earthworks and Road construction BIM in today’s workflows because of its suitability and support on various systems and construction software. IFC is a similar keyword for any structure such as a bridge or building. 

When PDF files are received, Construction BIM models are typically rebuilt by the Chief Surveyor as an extra data preparation step to enable any sort of surveying on site.

Challenges and Industry Perceptions

While ”build before you build” is a sound concept allowing significant simulation, BIM often falls short beyond this premise, raising the question: Has BIM failed? 

Some argue the concept needs rethinking and restarting, focusing on construction rather than design needs. Until then, the industry will continue to be held back. 

Project models may yet introduce challenges in the Construction BIM landscape too. Earthworks projects are full of surprises and rapid design changes are a must for successful projects. Thus, project models where the contractor does not have access to rapid digital design changes, leaves a ton of the available benefits behind.  

Whatever the case, Design-build or Alliance project models where refined and approved models are available in a matter of days are generally seen as more successful compared to bid-build projects.  

One challenge for the Construction phase is that the same model needs to run on AEC-grade desktop computers and all field instruments that have much lower processing capacity. So, despite its potential, IFC workflows for construction use still require more optimization and standardization.

Practical Recommendations

 Owners should abandon a PDF approach and jump to procuring model-based construction; if it feels overwhelming to start with 2D drawings located in the project’s coordinates and scale, they can use DXF instead of DWG. Designers often prefer DWGs, but these are troublesome for neutral parties due to their proprietary binary format and complexity. DXF, by contrast, is open and easier for neutral parties to support. 

This proprietary versus open format debate leads to General Contractors working with whatever Designers provide, often resulting in double payment for BIM designs that miss out on more real-life benefits. Many customers have experienced full BIM designs being discarded at the start of construction, highlighting the disconnect between design BIM and practical construction needs. 

Any digital model or drawing is much better for the data prep step than PDF files, but the above points must be considered, and data needs to be converted and sanitized, typically to LandXML format for ultimate interoperability and to suit today’s site workflows.  

 

Conclusions

The closest the industry has come to interoperability between all stakeholders in the model-based process is the Inframodel standard that introduces sufficient requirements for design and site workflows. Thus, for IFC to succeed, MVD (Model View Definition) for Construction workflows would be needed and internationally agreed as a standard so that all stakeholders and vendors on site would be able to use the same model efficiently. 

In the meantime, Infrakit continues to provide a neutral platform for infrastructure projects, effectively managing the shift between Design BIM to field-ready Construction BIM. This can mean the difference between a project that is on time and under budget, and one that faces challenges in execution. Until the industry rethinks BIM from the ground up, focusing on practical construction needs and data flow, these challenges will persist. BIM has the potential to revolutionize construction, but only if it evolves to meet the practical realities of the field. 

Book time with our experts to discover how these solutions can be leveraged for improved efficiency and success in your next construction project.

Infrakit Transforms Digital Rail Construction

Infrakit Transforms Digital Rail Construction

Rhomberg Sersa Rail Group, a leader in railway construction, faced challenges in integrating digital solutions to streamline their operations. They partnered with Infrakit, aiming to enhance their project management and execution processes.

In our recent webinar, Peter Lenk from Infrakit talked to Patrick Giller, from their Digital Rail Services team.

Utilizing Infrakit’s comprehensive platform, Rhomberg Sersa integrated various digital tools into their workflow. These included real-time survey data, drone orthophoto-based maps and  360-degree site photos, all accessible through Infrakit’s cloud-based system.

The team effectively used these tools for planning, real-time monitoring, and seamless communication among project stakeholders.

The implementation of Infrakit led to significant improvements:

  • Efficiency: Enhanced data integration allowed for streamlined processes. Patrick Giller emphasized, “We can create our measurement virtually from the office without having to go directly to the construction site, with the photos documented here beautifully.” In other words, remote monitoring and measurement reduce the need for frequent site visits, saving travel costs and time
  • Accuracy: Precise georeferenced data resulted in minimized errors and rework, leading to significant cost savings. Efficient planning and visualization can prevent costly mistakes and improve the accuracy of project execution
  • Collaboration: Improved communication between on-site teams and project managers facilitated smoother project execution. Giller emphasized, “Infrakit is heavily used by us in construction management and in the exchange between the construction site and the office, project management, site supervision, foremen, machine operators, and our digital rail service team. We use the platform to support our digital solutions”.

Infrakit has proven to be a highly valuable tool for Rhomberg Sersa Rail Group, driving digital transformation in rail construction. Their experience underscores the platform’s potential to revolutionize project management and execution across the industry.

See the whole webinar here in German (you may turn on English captions using the Youtube player settings)

Book time with our experts to discover how these solutions can be leveraged for improved efficiency and success in your next construction project.

Book a Demo

Discover how Infrakit connects your entire infra project operations and drives value to every part of your business.

Industry series interview: Thomas Gröninger-Swietelsky

We had the pleasure of speaking with Thomas Gröninger from Austrian construction company Swietelsky AG. Thomas shared his insights on the transformative role of technology in the AEC sector, the challenges of digital adoption, and the future of sustainable practices.

Can you share a bit about your journey in the AEC technology industry and how you got started?

I started my journey as a site manager for infrastructure projects. I m really open minded regarding new technologies and Lean Construction. I had a lot of processes which costed me a lot of time and effort. I started to optimize construction processes to have a smoother and more efficient workflow doing my job as a site manager. After that I switched to a full time job doing this for different topics like for Mapping and BIM. I build up different groups and business units in a large construction company for digitalization to bring that mindset and technologies international. It’s like a digitalization fever. Until you see business unit working digital on their own, it is the proof that you did all right.

How has technology transformed the way projects are conceptualized, planned, and executed in the AEC industry during your career?

The most influence was or is BIM. As an requirement on some market in public tenders, there is no question if we want to transform. We have to!

Other technologies are improving the efficiency of some part of the construction process which makes it faster and in higher quality.

As someone deeply involved in AEC tech, what challenges have you encountered, and how have you overcome them?

The biggest challenge is the human challenge. The mindset and the fear to loosing competence while implementing digital tools and technologies. You need to understand different languages spoken on site, management, c-levels, etc. You need to translate your knowledge in different languages (I don’t talk about real language 😊)

Considering the current technological advancements, where do you see the future of AEC technology heading in the next 5-10 years?

Very clear for me. A.I. machine learning, deep learning. Robotics. Look at the development of robotics. Take as an Example that Robo-Dog. Technical that machine works. But there are not really use cases on site, because this dog is lacking in intelligence. Some companies are using it for their image but its fake.

Collaboration is crucial in AEC projects. How have collaborative tools and platforms evolved, and what role do they play in enhancing project efficiency, especially with diverse stakeholders like designers, engineers/surveyors, project managers and client owners?

You are talking about BIM. Let’s say the people are still in a learning curve. Depends also on the market we are looking to. Germany e.g. ist political on a high digitalization level, but the reality in a project can be the complete opposite. Paper, Emails, Letters, no CDE, etc. Some international project sometimes have some really high level communication platforms but it is more an exception then a standard.

Sustainability is a growing concern. How do you perceive the role of AEC technology in promoting sustainable practices within the industry?

For me sustainability is really important. I m also following that topic in my private life.

So many technologies are combined with sustainability. Look at GIS. We measure some Geodata on a project and can use it with GIS also in 5 years for a another project. Same for geological investigations and other Data. I remember an example where a university analysed how often the same wall is measured on a construction site because the people don’t share information.

At the moment sustainability is more a politcal issue, but we need to bring that understanding and knowledge to everyone on the construction industry.

With the rise of BIM (Building Information Modeling), how do you think it has impacted the design and construction phases of AEC projects, and what do you anticipate for its future?

For Building it is more developed then for infrastructure projects. So for infrastructure projects, the designers are not really delivering or working with BIM. Why? Because they have not the requirement from the clients. Because to design in BIM is more expensive then to design in old school way. Somebody who is responsible for the lifecycle of a building needs to pay for it.

As technology advances, there’s often a learning curve for industry professionals. How can the AEC sector ensure a smooth transition for its workforce into more tech-driven practices?

Step by Step and with different translations for different levels. The next generation will expect that tech driven workflows. Otherwhise they wont decide for a job in the construction industrie.

 

Are there any specific trends or emerging technologies in AEC that you find particularly exciting or promising for the industry’s future?

A.I. is for many people just a marketing flop, because currently it is not really A.I. It is a littlebit deep learning with not really good results. But in the future we can expect here a big change.

Looking beyond technology, what cultural or mindset shifts do you believe are necessary for the AEC industry to fully embrace and capitalize on technological advancements?

On the one hand we need to get an open minded basis on site to bring technologies to the construction process. On the other hand we have an average age of over 40 years on site and not everyone is familiar using new technologies. New staff is coming is learning the old way. We need to educate young people before they start their on site. The older generation we need to inform, train and pull into the new processes. Not push, pull! If you push, you’re doing the top down mistake.

How do you see the role of technology in bridging the gap between the physical and digital worlds within the AEC industry, and what impact do you think this connection will have on project development and execution?

It is needed to offer trainings and to be able to offer personal support to step into the digital world. How children learn do cycle? You explain it to them and then you assist them until they can manage it themselves. Same with the gap between physical and digital world.

Lastly, reflecting on your career, what advice would you give to young professionals entering the AEC technology field today?

Go first on a construction project and learn and feel the process to get an understanding of construction requirements. Then take your knowledge and try to think different and optimize processes. It’s the same like the McDonald brothers did it. They lived the conventional restaurant process and optimized it. That’s Lean. And Lean is not something which everyone needs to learn, it is just a personal attitude.

Book a Demo

Discover how Infrakit connects your entire infra project operations and drives value to every part of your business.

Industry series interview: Thomas Gröninger-Swietelsky

We had the pleasure of speaking with Thomas Gröninger from Austrian construction company Swietelsky AG. Thomas shared his insights on the transformative role of technology in the AEC sector, the challenges of digital adoption, and the future of sustainable practices.

Can you share a bit about your journey in the AEC technology industry and how you got started?

I started my journey as a site manager for infrastructure projects. I m really open minded regarding new technologies and Lean Construction. I had a lot of processes which costed me a lot of time and effort. I started to optimize construction processes to have a smoother and more efficient workflow doing my job as a site manager. After that I switched to a full time job doing this for different topics like for Mapping and BIM. I build up different groups and business units in a large construction company for digitalization to bring that mindset and technologies international. It’s like a digitalization fever. Until you see business unit working digital on their own, it is the proof that you did all right.

How has technology transformed the way projects are conceptualized, planned, and executed in the AEC industry during your career?

The most influence was or is BIM. As an requirement on some market in public tenders, there is no question if we want to transform. We have to!

Other technologies are improving the efficiency of some part of the construction process which makes it faster and in higher quality.

As someone deeply involved in AEC tech, what challenges have you encountered, and how have you overcome them?

The biggest challenge is the human challenge. The mindset and the fear to loosing competence while implementing digital tools and technologies. You need to understand different languages spoken on site, management, c-levels, etc. You need to translate your knowledge in different languages (I don’t talk about real language 😊)

Considering the current technological advancements, where do you see the future of AEC technology heading in the next 5-10 years?

Very clear for me. A.I. machine learning, deep learning. Robotics. Look at the development of robotics. Take as an Example that Robo-Dog. Technical that machine works. But there are not really use cases on site, because this dog is lacking in intelligence. Some companies are using it for their image but its fake.

Collaboration is crucial in AEC projects. How have collaborative tools and platforms evolved, and what role do they play in enhancing project efficiency, especially with diverse stakeholders like designers, engineers/surveyors, project managers and client owners?

You are talking about BIM. Let’s say the people are still in a learning curve. Depends also on the market we are looking to. Germany e.g. ist political on a high digitalization level, but the reality in a project can be the complete opposite. Paper, Emails, Letters, no CDE, etc. Some international project sometimes have some really high level communication platforms but it is more an exception then a standard.

Sustainability is a growing concern. How do you perceive the role of AEC technology in promoting sustainable practices within the industry?

For me sustainability is really important. I m also following that topic in my private life.

So many technologies are combined with sustainability. Look at GIS. We measure some Geodata on a project and can use it with GIS also in 5 years for a another project. Same for geological investigations and other Data. I remember an example where a university analysed how often the same wall is measured on a construction site because the people don’t share information.

At the moment sustainability is more a politcal issue, but we need to bring that understanding and knowledge to everyone on the construction industry.

With the rise of BIM (Building Information Modeling), how do you think it has impacted the design and construction phases of AEC projects, and what do you anticipate for its future?

For Building it is more developed then for infrastructure projects. So for infrastructure projects, the designers are not really delivering or working with BIM. Why? Because they have not the requirement from the clients. Because to design in BIM is more expensive then to design in old school way. Somebody who is responsible for the lifecycle of a building needs to pay for it.

As technology advances, there’s often a learning curve for industry professionals. How can the AEC sector ensure a smooth transition for its workforce into more tech-driven practices?

Step by Step and with different translations for different levels. The next generation will expect that tech driven workflows. Otherwhise they wont decide for a job in the construction industrie.

 

Are there any specific trends or emerging technologies in AEC that you find particularly exciting or promising for the industry’s future?

A.I. is for many people just a marketing flop, because currently it is not really A.I. It is a littlebit deep learning with not really good results. But in the future we can expect here a big change.

Looking beyond technology, what cultural or mindset shifts do you believe are necessary for the AEC industry to fully embrace and capitalize on technological advancements?

On the one hand we need to get an open minded basis on site to bring technologies to the construction process. On the other hand we have an average age of over 40 years on site and not everyone is familiar using new technologies. New staff is coming is learning the old way. We need to educate young people before they start their on site. The older generation we need to inform, train and pull into the new processes. Not push, pull! If you push, you’re doing the top down mistake.

How do you see the role of technology in bridging the gap between the physical and digital worlds within the AEC industry, and what impact do you think this connection will have on project development and execution?

It is needed to offer trainings and to be able to offer personal support to step into the digital world. How children learn do cycle? You explain it to them and then you assist them until they can manage it themselves. Same with the gap between physical and digital world.

Lastly, reflecting on your career, what advice would you give to young professionals entering the AEC technology field today?

Go first on a construction project and learn and feel the process to get an understanding of construction requirements. Then take your knowledge and try to think different and optimize processes. It’s the same like the McDonald brothers did it. They lived the conventional restaurant process and optimized it. That’s Lean. And Lean is not something which everyone needs to learn, it is just a personal attitude.

Book a Demo

Discover how Infrakit connects your entire infra project operations and drives value to every part of your business.

Employee interview: Sarah Meronen, User Experience Lead

I had the pleasure of discussing user experience work at Infrakit with Sarah Meronen, our UX Lead. Sarah is a member of our Product team at Infrakit HQ.

Sarah, could you tell us what does your regular day consist of, or is there such a thing as a regular day?

It really depends on what I’m working on – and which product of ours. Sometimes I’m more design focused, those days I will spend most of my time in Figma and going back and forth with people on feedback. Focusing on research, I could be setting up user tests, analysing data in spreadsheets, and the like.

What got you interested in UX?

I always enjoyed making websites and creating art growing up. When I was working construction after finishing high school, I looked up what types of jobs could be done with the web and found ”UX”, so I signed up for design school.

What’s the most exciting part in user experience work?

For me, that I get to be hands on in the full depth of what ux work is – from understanding a problem, researching, designing, testing.

What’s something that people don’t know about UX but is very critical in your work?

UI (user interface) does not equal UX, but UI is a part of the UX. Focusing purely on UI can mean missing opportunities that go beyond the surface level.

If we think about product and R&D functions in general, we still don’t have enough diversity in those. Many girls don’t really have role models to look up to in coding, for example. What would you say to young women interested in your field of expertise?

UX careers are more balanced than other fields in STEM if I do a quick google search. And I’d say that is mostly my experience in recent years. I think its important for young women, especially, to have confidence in their work and their worth. Also, finding someone you can relate to and confide in helps your career in so many ways. I have worked with wonderful people who have helped increase my confidence and given great resources to learn with, from managers to a more senior ux researcher who left a lasting impact.

Annika Helisvaara, HR Manager
May, 2024

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Discover how Infrakit connects your entire infra project operations and drives value to every part of your business.

Industry series interview: Magnus Thibblin

Recently, we caught up with Magnus Thibblin, a 25+ year veteran in the heavy construction industry to share his outlook on a range of AEC topics. This interview is the first in line of interviews with experienced industry professionals. Stay tuned for more, and here is what Magnus had to say:

Can you share a bit about your journey in the AEC technology industry and how you got started?

”I started in the industry as an end user in Sweden many years ago. It was, in a way, at the beginning of the machine control journey where a lot of 2D systems were being deployed foremost on excavators (Sweden was at the forefront for this specific application). At that time, 3D was a true add-on, which meant that you had two displays in the cabin, one dedicated to 2D functionality linked to another panel for 3D visualisation. Supplying the 3D features with accurate positioning data required GNSS positioning systems that were as fast, robust, and accurate as possible.

Already at the beginning of digitalisation, it was clear that an ecosystem was needed as 3D data was used not only for machine control systems but all different technologies in the field that utilised the same data (which was, and still is, of the highest importance).

As an example, the desktop software needed to be able to import/export the same format as the field tools, no matter if it was a GNSS rover or a “machine tool”. To make it even more complicated, there were no standard data formats…. Why did the focus shift towards ”closed” ecosystems with a secondary consideration for import and export functionality in general?

As the journey continued, the machine control part got more unified with one display, one software in the cabin, and faster, more robust GNSS options (adding more constellations and channels & supporting many more machine types, etc). In addition, various import/export capabilities and a growing understanding of the challenge for connected ecosystems emerged as mixed fleets became more and more common.

During the beginning of this journey, it was more of a “push” effect from all technology manufacturers, but as the technology matured and the “pull” from the market grew faster, many of the OEMs got connected as well. (Some earlier than others)

Even if I have been in this industry for a long time and in many ways, thought we would be a bit further by now…it still excites me as we have so much more to do for our customers.

This is an industry that needs all of us to work towards sustainability, connecting all the ecosystems, improving the ease of use, improving safety and finally, whatever projects are being built – be on time, on budget & specifications to make sure that the final infrastructure product has the right lifespan.”

 

How has technology transformed the way projects are conceptualized, planned, and executed in the AEC industry during your career?

”This has been an evolving part as well as everything in the AEC industry during my career; improvements & new software have not just evolved but transformed ways of conceptualising projects, and stronger software packages have been created for planning and executing.

For the planning & executing part, there have been large strides where significant progress has been made to enable real-time feedback loops. This not only enhances productivity but also facilitates a comprehensive understanding of planned and executed aspects of the job. These processes are seamlessly interconnected through cloud solutions, enabling convenient access and exchange of information in “real time”. (Or as close as it can be right now)”

As someone deeply involved in AEC tech, what challenges have you encountered, and how have you overcome them?

”I think that, in general, technology moves quite fast, which is a challenge in itself. This implies that progress may be faster in certain regions, demanding tech providers to adapt accordingly. However, the global pace of advancement may not be uniform calling for an approach that accommodates varying speeds of progress worldwide.

On top of this, all tech providers are always looking at how they can be disruptive or lead a change to gain an edge or create a new offering, but at the same time, not be pricing themselves out of the market.

All of the above are true challenges, as well as knowing when a technology is mature enough to be used in certain environments/markets and considering local laws and regulations. This has a big impact on tech providers; even if it’s possible to create a solution/offering, it might not be the right time due to the above challenges.

It many times comes down to timing.

The answers on how to overcome some of these are simply to have or to gain very strong industry knowledge, be very close to the market as well as be part of discussions with regulatory organs in many key countries/markets but saying “simply” is clearly oversimplifying the challenge, but still, that is partly the answer to the question.”

 

Considering the current technological advancements, where do you see the future of AEC technology heading in the next 5-10 years?

”First of all, I think that we will see much more collaboration and partnerships within the AEC industry. No one provider can solve all the challenges that we all face; it is a mix of technology advancements and several steps of autonomy in combination with AI deployed in the right places at the right time and simplifying the tech usage for more users in the entire construction process.

This will create transparency and more people being on the same “page”, which also will help with tech adoption overall, which is highly needed to attract our younger generations across the different parts of our industry.

Within this timeframe, I see even more technology being adopted in several steps, more emphasis on connected ecosystems and hopefully also some very strong strides when it comes to standardisation of formats to create even more transparency and data flow.”

 

Collaboration is crucial in AEC projects. How have collaborative tools and platforms evolved, and what role do they play in enhancing project efficiency, especially with diverse stakeholders like designers, engineers/surveyors, project managers and client owners?

”Yes, as I touched a bit on above, one of the key factors for successful planning/execution/handover is for sure collaboration tools across the phases of the project.

Even if good strides are being made, we are still, in many ways, missing a “standard toolset” for a seamless project transition from inception to finalisation. With all the different stakeholders and all the different personas on-site or off-site in mind, however, if we only look at the construction phase, a few tool options are emerging (some new, some have been growing over time) which have a clear goal of connecting the entire construction data flow/handling with efficiency as the main focus. This is good news as we need to see to it that the customer’s daily challenges become less complex.

The focus for the project/customer should be on how to complete the project on time, on budget and on specification rather than focusing on data handling complexity where a lot of errors can occur. (And time is wasted)”

 

Sustainability is a growing concern. How do you perceive the role of AEC technology in promoting sustainable practices within the industry?

”Sustainability is a huge topic for all of us, and by using small parts of existing AEC technology, we are taking steps towards sustainability improvements, but it is clear that the technology providers have a great role to play in educating what the technology does for the environment. Just to name a few, utilising digital technology provenly improves resource utilization, minimizes waste, and reduces environmental impact throughout the project lifecycle. This collaborative approach between technology providers and industry stakeholders is crucial for fostering a greener and more sustainable future for the construction sector and beyond.”

With the rise of BIM (Building Information Modeling), how do you think it has impacted the design and construction phases of AEC projects, and what do you anticipate for its future?

”BIM has been a subject for a long time now, and I think it has gotten parts of the evolution & discussion to be where it should be.

Sometimes, I do feel that we are not as fast as we should be, but once again, we have so many aspects that need to be considered; hence, it is taking more time.

Looking towards the future, I anticipate BIM will continue to play a pivotal role in the AEC industry to achieve our sustainability and quality goals. We can expect further integration of BIM with emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and augmented reality, unlocking even greater capabilities for project stakeholders.”

As technology advances, there’s often a learning curve for industry professionals. How can the AEC sector ensure a smooth transition for its workforce into more tech-driven practices?

”To ensure a smooth transition to tech-driven practices, the AEC sector should implement comprehensive training programs, collaborate closely with technology providers, and foster a culture of innovation. As mentioned earlier, the main goal must be to make technology accessible and intuitive. Easy to use!

One of the challenges has been an ageing workforce and, at the same time, attracting a younger workforce. Developing “easy to use” tools is needed to solve both.

And even more in the future as you will see tools connected to different stakeholders with a lot of different levels of education. This approach will enable AEC professionals to leverage technology to enhance productivity, efficiency, and overall project outcomes.”

Are there any specific trends or emerging technologies in AEC that you find particularly exciting or promising for the industry’s future?

”I think that would be AI in combination with autonomous technologies/steps. The question will be how fast it will go, as so much attention is on it right now. The question is only what will be accepted and approved for such a conservative industry with a very high safety focus.”

Looking beyond technology, what cultural or mindset shifts do you believe are necessary for the AEC industry to fully embrace and capitalize on technological advancements?

”This is a good question; change can go slow or fast. It is normally a push from tech, and after a while, it becomes a pull effect from the market, and we can see this clearly with tech usage.

However, to truly embrace and capitalise on tech, governmental bodies should be given stronger direction regarding technology usage in any building and infrastructure project. For instance, it would/should not be possible to bid for a job without using digital processes and technology such as machine control & 3D solutions.

I have seen many different ways this can be done in several countries; it drives not only adoptions, it drives a higher standard and quality output, which we all know we need.”

 

How do you see the role of technology in bridging the gap between the physical and digital worlds within the AEC industry, and what impact do you think this connection will have on project development and execution?

”This is one of the key roles that all tech providers have, to bring the physical and the digital worlds “together”. To me is a big part of BIM or SIM, working from one design model synced with all changes on site, the physical world.

This will have a huge impact on project development and execution; with many different sensors on the several “tools” out in the field. You can get accurate information looping back to the planning and design teams, which, in the end, helps to plan more accurately out in the field and vice versa.

As mentioned above, integrating digital technologies and bridging the gap between the physical and digital worlds in construction promotes greater efficiency and sustainability, reducing waste and providing cost savings.”

Lastly, reflecting on your career, what advice would you give to young professionals entering the AEC technology field today?

”Be bold, be brave and challenge the status quo.

Even if I have been in this industry my entire life, and for sure thought we would have been further in some areas by now, I find it extremely exciting and challenging as we have so much more to do together. Not only improve the current technology landscape but disrupt and challenge how we do it today. It is needed to gain great strides with completely new ways of collecting/exchanging data and collaborating across disciplines and personas in the whole construction process.

Just as an example, think about collaboration (how can 1+1 equal 3), how can more people benefit from what you are doing? How can you change/improve what is done today to become something better?

And most importantly, don’t be afraid to ask more questions.”

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